Glucose Infusion Rate: GIR Calculator

GIR Calculator

You can use the GIR calculator to compute the total glucose infusion rate from a mixture of up to three dextrose concentrations. The glucose infusion rate calculator, as well as some supplemental information, can be found in the article below.

Dextrose is a simple sugar that has the same chemical make-up as glucose. We can find it in a variety of foods, but we can also use it for medical purposes. Dextrose boosts a patient’s blood sugar when given intravenously.

The glucose infusion rate (GIR) is a measurement of how quickly these carbs are delivered to the patient. GIR is a normal practice for all babies receiving parenteral dextrose, and it helps the practitioner to confirm that the neonate’s blood glucose level is within safe limits. We measured gIR in mg of glucose per kilogram of body weight per minute (mg/kg/min).

The following are GIR’s recommendations:

  • For term newborns, a range of 4 to 6 mg/kg/min should assigned; for preterm infants, a range of 5 to 8 mg/kg/min should assigned.
  • A GIR of less than 4 mg/kg/min can cause catabolism and neurological impairment, whereas a GIR of over 18–20 mg/kg/min raises the risk of lipogenesis and fatty liver deposits.

Gir Calculator Formula

We show the formula for calculating glucose infusion rate from dextrose concentration below:

GIR = [IV rate (mL/hr) * Dext Conc (g/dL) * 1000 (mg/g)] / [weight (kg) * 60 (min/hr) * 100 (mL/dL)]

Where:

  • GIR is glucose infusion rate
  • IV rate is infusion rate;
  • Dext Conc is dextrose concentration; and
  • Weight is a patient’s weight.

The GIR calculator can compute the total glucose infusion rate from a mixture of up to three dextrose concentrations. Simply follow these three simple steps:

  • First, enter the patient’s weight.
  • Choose whether you wish to use a single concentration of dextrose or a combination of many.
  • To calculate GIR from dextrose concentration, enter the dextrose concentration(s) and infusion rate(s).

Gir Calculator Parameters

The patient’s body weight, height, and gender are considered when computing the GIR formula. From the dextrose source, the concentration and infusion rate were determined in percent and mL/hr, respectively. The formula is also used to determine the GIR in children.

  • It is simple to compute one’s body weight.
  • The newborn child’s height we calculate using the children’s height predictor.
  • The predictor considers factors such as genetics. Heights of mother and father.
  • The average of the parents’ genetic heights is calculated by
  • To determine the boy’s height, multiply the average by two and a half inches.
  • To find the girl’s height, subtract two and a half inches from the average.

The formula is a universal GIR formula that anyone may use.

How to Calculate Gir (Example)?

A child weighing 1.5 kg given two dextrose concentrations:

A 10% dextrose solution was administered at a rate of 20 ml/hr; and a 15% dextrose solution was administered at a rate of 5 ml/hr.

1. For a 10% dextrose solution, we must compute GIR:

GIR = [IV rate (mL/hr) * Dext Conc (g/dL) * 1000 (mg/g)] / [weight (kg) * 60 (min/hr) * 100 (mL/dL)]

GIR = [20 mL/hr * 10 g/dL * 1000 mg/g] / [1.5 kg * 60 min/hr * 100 mL/dL]

GIR =200,000 / 9000

GIR = 22.22 mg/kg/min

2. We will calculate the GIR for the 15 percent dextrose solution next:

GIR = [15 mL/hr * 5 g/dL * 1000 mg/g] / [1.5 kg * 60 min/hr * 100 mL/dL]

GIR = 75,000/ 9000

GIR = 8.33 mg/kg/min

3. The following formula can now compute the final glucose infusion rate

GIR = GIR1 + GIR2

GIR = 22.22mg/kg/min + 8.33 mg/kg/min

GIR = 30.55mg/kg/min

Hyperglycaemia

When total GIR is less than 4mg/kg/min, neonatal hyperglycemia arises due to low sugar levels in babies. It occurs when the newborn’s plasma level falls below 30 mg/dL within the first 24 hours of life. If it drops below 45 mg/dL within the first 24 hours of a newborn’s existence, hypoglycemia is almost certain to occur. This isn’t a major problem. It’s a common complication in newborns caused by metabolic problems. Poor nutrition of the mother during pregnancy, high insulin levels in the mother if she has poorly controlled diabetes, birth asphyxia, and liver infections are further causes.

Low glucose levels in the body can cause neurological problems. We can measure blood glucose levels in newborns in a variety of ways. We can detect hypoglycemia with a glucose reagent strip. If the results are lower than expected, the blood sample should forward to the lab for validation of the results using the glucose oxidation or glucose electrode methods. However, treatment should begin only when hypoglycemia is detected. We should not postpone it until we received the lab findings.

Treatment of newborn hypoglycemia is highly subjective. We determine it by the baby’s gestational age and post-delivery health. The immediate treatment includes giving a glucose supply along with water. If giving the glucose dose orally is not practicable, we gave the dextrose infusion to the baby through an infusion rate calculator. The blood glucose level was monitored after this treatment to assess if it has returned to normal.

Dextrose in Infants

As a medicinal intervention for hypoglycemia, we can use dextrose in children in the same way we use it in adults.

Children frequently administered dextrose intravenously in cases of severe hypoglycemia in children. Untreated hypoglycemia can cause brain damage in children and newborns, thus prompt and early treatment is critical. Dextrose can be given orally to youngsters if they can consume it.

Infants with newborn hypoglycemia, which can be caused by a variety of conditions, including metabolic problems or hyperinsulinism, can have small quantities of dextrose gel added to their meal to help them maintain normal blood sugar levels. If you’re not sure how much dextrose to include in your diet, talk to your doctor. Prematurely born babies are at risk for hypoglycemia, and IV may administer dextrose.

Conclusion 

Our GIRcalculator will help you compute the total glucose infusion rate from a mixture of up to three dextrose concentrations. However, the glucose infusion rate is a measurement of how quickly carbohydrates are delivered to the patient. In order to avoid hyperglycemia and steatosis, this value should be fewer than 4 mg/kg/min.

FAQs

What is a glucose infusion rate calculator?

The GIR calculator is a tool for calculating the number of carbohydrates ingested by a patient. It’s an important component that’s in charge of a lot of cellular operations. The Glucose Infusion Rate (GIR) is a formative, analytical, calculating approach that is defined and represented in milligrams of glucose per kilogram of body weight per minute (mg/kg/min).
The following equation can calculate the rate of glucose infusion:
GIR = (Concentration, g/100 mL) x (Infusion rate, mL/hr) x (1000) / (Weight, kg) x (60 min/hr)

What is Gir in hypoglycemia?

If hypoglycemia continues, many units’ current policy is to increase the glucose infusion rate (GIR) by 2 mg/kg/min every 15 to 30 minutes [7, 8]. This process is time-consuming and includes many computations, resulting in a time lag and inaccuracies in fluid preparation.

How quickly can you provide IV glucose?

We should deliver glucose 50 percent via a central vein after proper dilution, unless in the emergency treatment of severe hypoglycemia. When used to treat hypoglycemia in an emergency, we should inject gently Glucose 50 percent into a peripheral vein at a rate of no more than 3mls per minute.

What is dextrose?

Dextrose is a simple sugar made from corn that is chemically identical to glucose, also known as blood sugar. Dextrose is a sweetener commonly used in baking products and can also be found in processed foods and corn syrup.
We also used dextrose in medicine. It’s dissolved in intravenous solutions that can be combined with other medications or used to raise a person’s blood sugar. The body can readily use dextrose for energy since it is a “simple” sugar.
Simple sugars can easily elevate blood sugar levels and are devoid of nutritious value. Glucose, fructose, and galactose are examples of other simple sugars. Refined sugar, white pasta, and honey are examples of simple sugar-based products.

What is the significance of the glucose infusion rate?

The glucose infusion rate is a measurement of how quickly carbohydrates are delivered to the patient. In order to avoid hyperglycemia and steatosis, this value should be fewer than 4 mg/kg/min.
Back to top button